Fall is for Bulbs

October 14, 2018


It’s that crisp time of the year again. If it wasn’t for my seasonal anxiety I would love fall. I mean I still do, but I just wish it was followed by Spring. Let’s just skip winter, why not?

 

Well.. I can’t change Nature’s cycles and perhaps that’s a good thing, for all of the seasons are very much needed.

 

Fall is the best time of the year to do many activities in the garden and planting bulbs is one of them.

 

 

 

Bulbs are usually set deep inside the soil before winter, because they actually need the freezing temperatures to “wake them up”.

 

After that, when the days get warmer and longer again they get their cue of sprouting. That’s the process of breaking dormancy. 

 

Look at this amazing tulip bulb I forgot inside my gardening apron through all winter. It followed its course even outside the soil. Inside of it carries all the nutrients and genetic information it needs to begin a new life.

 

 

 

Great edible bulbs you can plant in fall include garlic and onions. This way you’ll have a beautiful harvest for spring. Garlic is actually from the Allium family which has beautiful flowers,  many of them are used exclusively for their flowering show! Fresh organic garlic and beautiful flowers, win win right there!

 

On that note, I just CANNOT skip the flower bulbs!!! I Personally I can’t live without them!

 

I love when they emerge in early Spring whispering that there’s hope again! The warm days will come back! Life seems to sprout in me too!

 

 

 

Then all the color! The delicate and different shaped flowers coming from all over. So beautiful!!!!

 

Yes it’s true that they don’t last long, but they are totally worth the wait and in that short time we are blessed by their flowers!

 

 

 

The September to November period of planting frenzy are happening now! So let’s get to it!

 

There are so many types of flower bulbs you can plant. My favorite are Tulips and Alliums! All of them!

 

 

 

Bulbs are usually perennials so you don’t have to plant them again next year. But different species last different times. Since I often stab my bulbs with the shovel while planting something else in the garden, I like to add some extra every fall. After all, there’s never too many flowers in early spring!

 

Usually the flowering bulbs will enjoy the full sun, which is over 8 hours a day. Some can become fairly big plants so consider checking the mature size of it to plant it in a place you and your plant will like.

 

 

If you change your mind you can change your bulbs location anytime, just mind the flowers for they are delicate.

 

I plant the bulbs at least 6” deep in the soil, specially if it’s going to be a tall plant. It needs the support and I risk having floppy flowers in spring if not planted deep enough.

 

 

 

I also like planting my bulbs in groups. Depending on the size of the plant, if very small as in the case o Crokus, I plant them in groups as big as 10 ones together. That gives them a much bigger impact! Bigger bulbs I plant in groups of 5 or 3. The giant ones in 2s.

 

 

 

Funny noobie mistake - not planting the bottom of the bulb faced DOWN! hahahaha I know it sounds silly but people often do that. And kid you not, sometimes is actually hard to figure out which side is which. But make the effort! Put each one of them, even when annoyingly small, bottom down!

 

 

 

I hope I helped you guys to get to enjoy some flowers next spring! They are absolutely worth it!!!

 

More than Gardens have the most beautiful selection of flowering bulbs as well as edible bulbs and we can help you design a beautiful and functional Spring garden next year! Give us a call or send us an email and we will love to hear from you!

 

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